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MSNBC: Four Convertibles That Don't Compromise


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VOLVO C70 trunk (13 cu.ft. top up - almost 5 cu.ft. top down)

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Volvo C70 Going Topless
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SEE ALSO: Compare Pontiac G6, Volkswagen EOS, Mazda MX-5, Volvo C70
SEE ALSO: Compare ALL convertibles sold in the U.S. by dimentions and capacities.

But First Snide's Remarks; As a dyed in the wool long time convertible lover and owner I got really excited when I first saw these topless offerings at the various auto shows over the past few years...they looked great with the top down...until I looked in the trunk... or looked where a trunk was supposed to be...The 2 seaters had no space absolutely NO SPACE for anything but an attache case or a scrunchable tote bag...the 4 seaters a little more....so you ask youself, why would these obviously fun weekend rides need trunk space?

Well I think it would be cool to have your new sexy convertible take you and a "friend" (roadster) or "friends" (4 seater) for a weekend: a)In Wine Country, b)At The Beach, c)At The Lake, d)In The Country, e)In The City or anyplace a topdown, sun in the eyes summer day, might be appropriate...but NO, No WAY, WON'T HAPPEN...THERE IS NO TRUNK SPACE with the top down. (Unless you and/or your passengers just take thongs and teddy's and don't mind wearing the same clothing for a few days).

These Hardtop convertibles (shades of the 1956 Ford Sunliner) do look cool, BUT I will stick with my 1990 Mazda RX7 convertible, it has enough trunk space for a weekend or more, and it still has a half hard top...and at my age half is ok.

Let me know what you think; msnide@theautochannel.com. Now on to the story.

MSNBC has compiled a list of what it calls the four best hard-top convertibles on the road. They are the Mazda MX-5 Miata, the Pontiac G6 convertible, Volkswagen's Eos and the Volvo C70.

These four cars are not so much competitors as complements to one another, with each offering its own set of advantages and drawbacks, with their convertible roofs as their common factor.

With their roofs up, inside and out they are indistinguishable from conventional closed-roof cars. That means no leaks, no wind roar, no rattles and no yellowed plastic rear window.

But with the touch of a switch their drivers can transform themselves from the cautious, conservative types who shy away from risky convertibles into the outgoing, sun-loving extroverts they really want to be.