In-vehicle Wearable Integration to Accelerate Convergence; Global Penetration in New Cars to Exceed 90% by 2019


connected car

LONDON--Feb. 4, 2014: In-vehicle wearable integration is the latest trend in automotive with announcements following each other in quick succession: Harman’s ADAS Google Glass integration, Hyundai’s Blue Link Glassware application, Mercedes’ Pebble smart watch Digital DriveStyle application, BMW’s i3 EV Samsung Galaxy Gear smart watch integration, Nissan’s Nismo concept smart watch displaying biometric and vehicle diagnostics and performance data, and INRIX’s real-time traffic Google Glass demo app. Logically following in the wake of in-vehicle smartphone integration, wearable form-factors will interface – directly or via phones – with more than 90% of vehicles shipping globally in 2019.

“With in-car infotainment becoming a key customer proposition, the automotive industry is designing user interfaces both offering a rich and convenient experience and guaranteeing safety by preventing driver distraction. While head unit proximity touch screens, heads up displays and speech recognition are now well established, the quest for next-generation automotive HMI is still on with gesture recognition, eye control and augmented reality edging closer to implementation. At the same time, wearable form-factors are being explored bearing testimony to the automotive industry’s objective to keep up with consumer electronics innovation. But they also contribute to creating a seamless digital user experience inside and outside the vehicle,” says VP and practice director, Dominique Bonte.

However, the use of wearables in cars is controversial with many governments dismissing them for safety reasons. Legislation banning eyewear is already prepared in several US states and in the UK. But jurisdiction seems to be lacking as illustrated by cases dismissed on grounds it could not be proven the device was either switched on or a distracting application used. Clearly, it is not the form-factor which should be banned but certain use cases such as watching videos. Eyewear functioning as dash cams or for displaying blind spot or collision safety alerts will contribute to safer driving, not deter it. At the same time wearables will kick start a thriving aftermarket connected car application ecosystem.

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Infotainment Research Service (Infotainment), which provides detailed installed base and forecasts of the car infotainment market.

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