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Ghosts and Goblins Make Halloween Driving Spooky

halloween (select to view enlarged photo)

BETHESDA, MD--Oct. 22, 2013: Halloween is one of the most anticipated times of the year for young children. To help keep trick-or-treaters as safe as possible, the Car Care Council reminds motorists to drive slowly, especially through neighborhoods, to be extra careful when entering or exiting driveways or alleyways, and to be car care aware by making sure their vehicle's brakes, lights and wipers are working properly.

A vehicle's brake system is the most critical safety item on a vehicle, but brakes wear out and eventually need replacement. Several factors that affect brake wear include driving habits, operating conditions, vehicle type and the quality of the brake lining material. Never put off routine brake inspections or any needed repairs, such as letting the brakes get to the "metal-to-metal" point, which can be potentially dangerous and lead to more costly repairs.

Drivers should check windshield wipers and windshield fluid, as well as the vehicle's lights for maximum performance and visibility on Halloween. This year, the end of Daylight Saving Time isn't until Nov. 3, which means that children will be out at dusk trick-or-treating. Driving at dusk is difficult because although the sky is still bright, objects on the road can merge with shadows and fade into darkness.

Parents and adults should remind their little ghosts and goblins to get out of cars on the curb side and not the traffic side, to stop at all corners and to use crosswalks. Children should look left, right and left again before crossing, stay on sidewalks, avoid crossing through yards and wear bright, reflective and flame retardant clothing.

"We can all help keep young pedestrians safe on Halloween by checking our vehicle's safety items, reminding children of basic safety rules and taking extra precautions when driving through neighborhoods," said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council.