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GM Grows Range of Vehicles for NGOs in Emerging Markets


chevy pickup (select to view enlarged photo)
Chevrolet N300 Pickup

Isuzu DMAX and Chevrolet N300 latest vehicles to be offered Vehicle offering part of GM’s International Aid & Development Program International Fleet Sales is GM’s dealer for export of specialized products

DUBAI, U.A.E.--March 25, 2013: As part of its ongoing support for humanitarian work in emerging markets, General Motors announced today at the Dubai International Humanitarian Aid & Development Conference that it will offer two new specialized products to Non-Governmental Organizations to assist them in carrying out their projects.

The Isuzu DMAX and Chevrolet N300 Pickup are the latest additions to GM’s line-up for its International Operations’ Aid & Development Program. The Isuzu DMAX will be sold exclusively in Africa, while the Chevrolet N300 will also be sold in other emerging markets around the world.

International Fleet Sales, GM’s dealer for the export of specialized products since 1999, will distribute the vehicles and provide aftersales support for NGOs and other customers in the Aid and Development sector.

“Customer service is a key priority for GM and IFS, and we will continue to work hard to ensure that these vehicles are properly serviced and maintained so that they can be kept on the road and assist NGOs in their vital work,” said Mark Barnes, GM International Operations Vice President, Sales, Marketing and Aftersales.

GM launched its Aid & Development Program in October 2012 at AidEx, the Global Humanitarian & Development Aid Event, where it offered the Chevrolet Trailblazer SUV and Chevrolet Colorado midsize pickup for NGOs.

IFS signed a five-year agreement in October to distribute the vehicles and provide aftersales support.

Both the Isuzu DMAX and Chevrolet N300 are robust vehicles well suited for challenging off-road driving and the weather conditions faced by users in emerging markets, Barnes said.