Convertibles That Get 13+ MPG


PHOTO (select to view enlarged photo)
2012 Lamborghini Murcielago Roadster "The Next To Worst" MPG

PHOTO (select to view enlarged photo)
2012 Mini Cooper 30MPG

CLICK HERE to see ALL convertibles sold in North America already ranked by MPG.

Convertibles

At the beginning of the automotive age, all cars were convertibles. Like the carriages from which they descended, they were basically open vehicles. If they had tops at all, the tops were made of folding cloth to offer some protection from the elements to passengers in bad weather. In 1910, Cadillac introduced the first closed-roof car, but convertibles continued to be popular for their open-air driving experience and often sportier nature.

Proposed U.S. Government safety regulations in the 1970s nearly saw the demise of the convertible here, and in fact the 1976 Cadillac Eldorado was touted to be "the last convertible in America". Rumors of the genre's demise were, however, premature. Changes in construction and additional safety equipment including extra-strong windshield frames and pop-up roll bars behind the seats allowed convertibles to meet all safety standards. On the endangered species list through the 1980s, convertibles came back in a strong way in the 1990s and continue to gain in popularity today.

There are a number of sub-genres of convertible, and today use of those names is more to marketing whim than anything else. Four-seat convertibles are more likely to be called cabriolets in Europe. "Phaeton" was a term, derived from horse-drawn carriages, commonly used in the early 20th Century, but now discarded. "Roadster" and "Spyder" have been used for two-seaters, as has "Barchetta", in Italy at least.

When cars were commonly made with body-on frame construction, making a convertible version of a sedan was fairly simple. Little more than replacement of the metal top with a convertible one was necessary, as the body was not structural. Even then, though, four-seater convertibles usually had two, not four, doors for better rigidity. With modern unit construction, the top is a vital structural component. When it is removed, extra reinforcement of the lower section of the car is necessary. Because of this, convertibles often weigh more than their sedan or coupe counterparts.

In the beginning, all convertible tops were sturdy canvas cloth. Later cloth-backed vinyl became an alternative. Rear windows (backlights) were originally plastic, which quickly became translucent and impaired visibility. When better top-stowage mechanisms, and stronger glass, became available, glass backlights became more common, and are now universal.

The most recent development in convertible technology is the folding and disappearing metal top. Although the concept debuted in the Chrysler Thunderbolt show car in 1941, and reached production in 1957 in the Ford Skyliner, it was the Mercedes-Benz SLK, first released in 1997, that paved the way toward extinction of the cloth top. Now most premium convertibles have folding metal tops.

With over 175 convertible models to choose from it is important for potential buyers to "know before they try and buy"

If you want to know more (and we suggest that you do), The New Car Buyers Guide's exclusive Rank By Specs tool allows consumers to become experts and rank and then compare every vehicle sold in North America by every spec, dimension, capacity and performance criteria. CLICK HERE

-->

Home | Buyers Guides By Make | New Car Buyers Guide | Used Car Super Search | Total New Car Costs | Car Reviews Truck Reviews
Automotive News | TACH-TV | Media Library | Discount Auto Parts

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Auto Channel. Contact Information, Credits, and Terms of Use. These following titles and media identification are Trademarks owned by The Auto Channel, LLC and have been in continuous use since 1987 : The Auto Channel, Auto Channel and TACH all have been in continuous use world wide since 1987, in Print, TV, Radio, Home Video, Newsletters, On-line, and other interactive media; all rights are reserved and infringement will be acted upon with force.

Privacy Statement | Size Does Matter | Media Kit | XML SITE MAP | Affiliates

Send your questions, comments, and suggestions to Editor-in-Chief@theautochannel.com.

Submit Company releases or Product News stories to submit@theautochannel.com.
Place copy in body of email, NO attachments please.

To report errors and other problems with this page, please use this form.

Link to this page: http://www.theautochannel.com/